Hot as Hades

When i first visited this wondrous place it was at the height of summer where there are several signs warning the danger of trekking through the main attraction areas because of the extreme heat … uh … yes, they aren’t kidding. Continue reading

The Other Blue Angel …

… It’s been awhile since I shot fast moving things, so it was time to brush up on slightly different camera settings. It took a bit of trial and error, but I think I had it dialed in for what I had (lense-wise). I wanted to rent the Tamron 150-600mm beast of a lens, but my bad planning didn’t allow for its arrival in time, so I just went with my 28-300mm, turned my Nikon D850 into a DX machine, which gave me 450mm at the long end. I could’ve used 150mm more, but I can’t complain. Just to be there was a thrill. Luckily, there was a CVS across the street from where I was shooting as I forgot my earplugs – a highly recommended accessory – these things scream and roar that’ll keep your ears ringing for a couple hours afterwards.

(Click on images above to enlarge them)

It was a perfectly clear day. Blue sky. No wind. Lots of sunshine. And … lots of people! The latter was manageable and didn’t really get in the way as I was pointing skyward most of the time. There single-props, skydivers, Boeing 777, C41, a flight squadron called the Patriots and of course the Blue Angels.

Fleet week is one of those celebrations where you can think what you think about war machines, but in the end, you can’t dispute the raw power of these awesome machines that defy gravity, not to mention human tolerance in the amount of G-force one can sustain without blacking out.

Enjoy the results!

Entertainer by …

IMG_1727

… any other name, but much more than that. Last year whilst roaming the streets of Gion, Kyoto it was raining pretty hard, thwarting any chance of seeing the famed female entertainers scurrying about throughout the evening. Today started out no different as it again started off with several threatening sprinkles of rain – even late into the day. Feeling bummed, I gave up on any chance of being ‘rained out’ again. But, as luck would have it, Continue reading

A is not for Apple

Some think it morbid to want to go to such places as these. Some rather spend their holidays lying on the beach or spending time in some swank place … me? Wherever I can, I try to make time to visit off the beaten path places, places of cultural or world significance. Finally making it to this site (and city), has been a longtime Bucket List … check.

The enduring city of Hiroshima hosts (unfortunately) the Peace Memorial Museum which displays a memorial around the ill-fated August 6, 1945 event that would forever change the world as we see it today. Especially in light of today’s warring rhetoric b/n two chest-beating people in high positions to (yet again) change the world … or destroy it altogether.

Right now, the museum is undergoing a major renovation, so the main building isn’t accessible, but they did a good job at displaying things in their temporary home quite well. From a photographic sense, it didn’t feel right to make images of the havoc and devastation the A-Bomb had on personal human life, so documenting objects and the land around them was powerful enough to convey the loss. Will we, as humans, ever learn that disputes over (anything) are just small slivers of the larger more important things in life? This writing can easily take a political turn – it’s hard not to go there. But, the bottomline in all of this is living peaceably amongst ourselves. I know this is too rosy of an outlook on the many things we as humans fight about, so I would go there.

Imagery is powerful. Imagery teaches. Can imagery help to change some of our evils ways? In one of my images above, I couldn’t help but to simulate the ghostly blast on that ill-fated day …

How fitting to have gone to a peace event on August 6th in a nearby city be The Bay:  https://intrepidsojourns.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/peace/

 

Peace.

8:15am, August 6, 1945, Hiroshima, Japan was struck by the first atomic bomb that shook the country and the world testing both human invention and how tragic some of these innovations can be on human life and the human society around the world.

Held virtually every year since then, Japan and the world calls out for world peace with a ceremony of peace to mark remembrance of the over 140,000 irreplaceable human lives lost as a result of human conflict. Along with a solemn moment of silence, lanterns are set afloat along waterway shore where both the Peace Memorial Park and one the last surviving building stands to pay homage to these people and to look forward to a more forgiving future.

heiwa taiko

Remembrance & Celebration. The Heiwa Taiko drum group led the heart pounding beats. The man in blue is a survivor of the bombing; he was only 14 years old at the time.

A few years ago, the San Francisco Bay Area Peace Lantern Ceremony was started to commemorate this tragic event located at Aquatic Park in Berkeley, CA. This is my first time attending and was quite surprised at the attendance – both in numbers and in diversity. Asian, white, black, latino, young and old et al, all congregating under one common theme: peace. Even in today’s current crazy world political and societal misgivings, people seemingly still crave for this most basic of all things … to live harmoniously with and amongst each other. From all appearances, 2 to 3 thousand were on hand as night fell with the guidance of ceremonial Taiko drum performances, survivor testimony and buddhist prayer led us towards the lantern launching. The glow of the lanterns began to release their messages that were personalized by many in attendance. As the gentle current of the water picked up ever so slightly to give life to the lanterns, somber Japanese themed music could be heard along the shoreline. It was a surreal event designed to touch the soul and (hopeful) in renewing the good in the human spirit.

Here are a few images from the lanterns … amongst all of the lanterns, there were a few that struck a cord with me, you can’t miss them when viewing them individually. Maybe there is hope for humankind … (click on any of the image below to view in full screen)

 

 

 

Get off the Strip

vofa1

The Las Vegas Strip that is. Not far away, about an hour+ drive from all of the glitz, glamour and craziness of the commercial city of sin lies Nevada’s first state park. Upon taking the exit from the main highway from town, you begin to drive down a long straight away single lane paved road. Off into the distance, you can see mountain formations as you pass desert-like flat terrain. As you near these mountains, the road take a drastic (and very drivable I might add) turn … literally. The road becomes windy as you make your way for about 15 miles through this vast nothing-ness. At first, I thought to myself as I was driving along was, “… I hope this car doesn’t breakdown … cuz’ I ain’t seen anybody since I left the highway … I have some water, but not days worth …” This kind of thinking, yes, is self-preservation induced, but you have to think of these things as you scenery changes to complete remoteness – I’ve been there several times and yet, I’m still here!

 

Anyhow, making one last turn off from this road, a small sign reads, “Welcome to the Valley of Fire”. Encouraged to continue. Since the forecast (in July on this day) was supposed to be in the upper 90s to low 100s(*F), I wanted to arrive early enough to where the sun would be beating down on me straight overhead. Even at 8am, you can just feel it was going to be a toasty day – good thing is is that you’re out and away from the concrete and asphalt jungle which retains at least 20*F so it shouldn’t be too bad. After self-paying entry, make a few turns down the main park drive and you’re immediately transformed to another world.

The landscape turns to a rust colored wonderland of strange formations that (from movies) look like a scene from planet Mars – definitely not one that resembles Earth as we typically see it. The blacktop road undulates through this valley of fire colored pock- marked vermillion rolling hills. Along these roads are well marked vista points that point you towards the more structures such as Arch Rock, Elephant Rock with the Fire Wave not but a mile from a parking lot. This park, more than many others of this type have several easily accessible natural wonders to enjoy and marvel at. What’s even nicer is human traces around these wonders were far and few – I have seen the worst of human visitation in our grand state and national parks of the western part of the US. While setting out for one of the scenic areas, I happened upon a young couple making their way to the same spot. Being that they had been photographing it the night before, they knew the way – thankfully they helped lead the way.

 

Because of recent travels to places where heat is a factor, I have come to seek out lighter and lighter camera kit while upholding a certain amount of image quality (better than a quickie snap from my trusty iPhone), leaning towards a kit that has been making great strides in the digital area of photography over the past 4 or so years – Fujifilm. This trip was sort of an experiment for me to see what I can come up with with only a single focal length … ok, perhaps a screw on lens attachment to allow for a wide angle, I had two  lengths 27mm and 35mm. For the most part, the 27mm was on most of the time. I found myself not being bogged down by a zoom lens, let alone the carry weight. It was liberating in a way. For those of you who have ever lugged around a DSLR, you know where I’m coming from – especially those pro-type kits that border on 7lbs! This may not sound like a lot, but trust me, it begins to tug and tire you out more than you know when it’s strapped to you for more than 5 hours. My camera carry weight was around a pound and a half now. Heck, I schlepped more water (a definite must in these conditions) than I did in kit weight. Billed as a street photographers tool, I am becoming overwhelmingly convinced that the Fujifilm X100F is an all-around camera for most genres. Highly mobile. High image quality. Bonus … it’s whisper quiet shutter has allowed me to stealthy fire off frames in such forbidden places as monasteries …. shhhh.

 

We were lucky this day – weather wise. Although the sun was fully out and heating the desert, we were gifted a fair amount of cloud cover to filter the suns relentless beatdown allowing for a bit more exploration than usual for this time of year. It being just past high noon and the clouds beginning to disperse widely, it was time to leave and head back to the (even hotter) concrete jungle of the Las Vegas Strip. I highly recommend visiting this magical place for a day to give yourself a break from the one-arm bandit (and possibly from losing $$ too). Viva Las Vegas!

Ne Gases of the Past

Ne9Signs. It’s almost an American icon in and of itself. Whether a huge donut, an oversized pistachio nut, a purple dinosaur or a simple flashing motel light to tell us “No Vacancy”, the American backdrop has a strong history of signage and Las Vegas is probably at or near the center of all it. This is what drove me to want to see what a place called the “Neon Sign Boneyard Museum” was all about. Seemingly, it is a small operation operating on a small budget with a passion to tell visitors about the history of Las Vegas’ glorious past through signs. The boneyard isn’ particularly large in scale, but holds many of the familiar places most Americans have heard about while growing up, ranging from the Tropicana, Algiers, Las Vegas Club, Rivera and my personal fave the Stardust to name a few. The boneyard is just a fraction of what they have collected over the years and have resurrected them to pretty good viewable condition and in some cases restored them to a functioning state where the neon is actually operational.

Along the guided tour, you learn about the history of the signs, but also the politics of some and how they dictate what you see either downtown or on the Strip around signage. Very interesting I must say. The guide also educated us on the different expertise required to making these signs – from understanding science to engineering. Neon or Ne on the Periodic Table of elements, naturally gives off an orange hue and to get other colors, helium, mercury and other gases are used in combination to create yellow, blue and green. I surprised I remembered that! But before pumping any gas to create a vacuum, glass blowing experts have got to work their magic in creating tubes that can withstand pressure. Lots more techie stuff involved, but fascinating for sure.

Not much more to say about this place, but to encourage you to pay a visit the next time you’re in Vegas – you can do it in about an 2 hours door-to-door; if you’re staying downtown near Fremont St., less than that! I recommend booking in advance as tours at prime times (early morning and evenings) are usually booked. I highly encourage to book a tour just before sunset as it’s not quite dark yet not too light out. They don’t allow tripods so you need enough light to capture a cool background sky while capturing the essence of the signs themselves.

This is definitely a slice of Americana.